Stop UK lies & corruption

Home » Maria Miller

Category Archives: Maria Miller

Tory snouts in trough – Maria Miller

But Cameron said he hoped Mrs Miller would return to the cabinet “in due course”.

Maria Miller snout in trough

Maria Miller snout in trough

Advertisements

MPs with a financial interest in a Private NHS named & shamed

MPs with a financial interest in a Private NHS named & shamed

MPs with a financial interest in a Private NHS named & shamed

MPs with a financial interest in a Private NHS named & shamed

Yes, here are the MPs with a financial interest in a Private NHS – so no surprise that they’re abusing their role to implement NHS Privatisation

1. David Cameron – Prime Minister (Tory)

Handed a peerage to nursing and care home tycoon Dolar Popat, who has given the Tories more than £200,000 in donations.

2. Andrew Lansley – Former Health Secretary & architect of privatisation (Tory)

Received a £21,000 donation in Nov 2009 from John Nash, the former chairman of Care UK.

3. Harriet Baldwin – Tory whip (Tory)

Former executive at JP Morgan, a major player in private healthcare.

4. Greg Barker – former Energy Minister (Tory)

Held shares in Quester VCT 5 plc ,a venture capital firm with multiple investments in healthcare companies.

5. Henry Bellingham (Tory)

Former director of Lansdowne Advisory Ltd, which has shares in private healthcare company Circle.

6. Jake Berry (Tory)

Has registered interests in legal firm Squire Patton Boggs, which workd with multiple NHS trusts on PFI and PPP programs.

7. Graham Brady (Tory)

Former advisor to PA Consulting, a management consultancy company which has worked with the NHS’s new Clinical Commissioning Groups.

8. Simon Burns – former Health Minister (Tory)

Attended an oncology conference paid for by Aventis Pharma – a five-day trip to the US funded by a leading drug firm.

9. Nick de Bois (Tory)

Was the majority shareholder in Rapier Design Group, an events management company heavily involved with the private medical and pharmaceutical industries.

10. Steve Brine (Tory)

Received almost £15,000 in donations from James Lupton, the chairman of investment bankers, Greenhill Europe which has a global network of corporate relationships in the healthcare sector.

11. Aidan Burley (Tory)

Received six bottles of wine from Hitachi consultants for a speech in 2011. Hitachi Consulting UK built an online ‘portal’ for NHS commissioners to help them monitor performance.

12. Damian Collins (Tory)

Spent almost a decade working for marketing agency M&C Saatchi, whose clients include PPP healthcare, AXA insurance, Astrazeneca, Pfizer and Merck

13. David Davis – former shadow home secretary  (Tory)

Received a payment of £4,250 for a six-hour speaking engagement for private health insurance company Aviva.

14. Jonathan Djanogly (Tory)

Received £1,900 from Huntleigh Healthcare Ltd, which manufactures medical and orthopaedic equipment and instruments.

15. Richard Drax (Tory)

Received £14,000 in a series of donations from Derek Luckhurst, chief executive and owner of care home group Agincare.

16. Iain Duncan Smith – Work and Pensions Secretary (Tory)

Has shares in hygiene technology company Byotrol plc, which sells products to the NHS.

17. Philip Dunne (Tory)

Was a non-executive director for investment firm Baronsmead VCT 4 plc, which had multiple investments in private healthcare companies.

18. Michael Fallon – Defence Secretary  (Tory)

Former director of Attendo AB, – a Swedish private health company.

19. Mark Field (Tory)

Was a board advisor to Ellwood and Atfield; a recruitment firm which recruit for NHS positions and private healthcare.

20. Liam Fox – former Defence Secretary (Tory)

Received £5,000 from investment company IPGL Ltd, who purchased healthcare pharma company Cyprotex.

21.  George Freeman (Tory)

Has shares in Hill House Assets Ltd, formally private health firm 4D Biomedical Ltd.

22. Mike Freer  (Tory)

Provided marketing advice to Care Matters, a financial planning company for care homes.

23. Richard Fuller (Tory)

Worked for L.E.K consulting, which has six ‘partners’ in European healthcare.

24. Richard Graham (Tory)

Received £3,000 from asset manager Crispin Odey, a major investor in Circle.

25. William Hague – Leader of the Commons (Tory)

Received a £20,000 donation from MMC Ventures, which parts owns The Practice plc which runs 60 GP surgeries.

26. Philip Hammond – Foreign Secretary (Tory)

Beneficiary of a trust which owns a controlling interest in healthcare and nursing home developer Castlemead Ltd.

27. Mark Harper (Tory)

Received £5,000 from asset manager Crispin Odey, a major investor in Circle.

28. Nick Herbert  (Tory)

Received £15,000 in donations from Caroline Nash, wife of former Care UK chairman John Nash.

29. Jeremy Hunt – Health Secretary  (Tory)

Received £32,920 from hedge fund baron Andrew Law, a major investor in healthcare firms.

30. Margot James  (Tory)

Had a key role at marketing giant WPP Group, which had a long list of healthcare clients.

31. Sajid Javid – Culture Secretary (Tory)

Received £11,000 from Moundsley Healthcare Ltd last year.

32. Jo Johnson – Downing Street policy adviser (Tory)

Received £6,000 from asset manager Crispin Odey, a major investor in Circle.

33. Kwasi Kwarteng (Tory)

Worked as an analyst for for Crispin Odey’s hedge fund Odey Asset Management.

34. Mark Lancaster (Tory)

Former adviser to property venture capital firm Company Palmer Capital Partners Ltd, a funder of Danescroft Commercial Developments, which has worked in the healthcare sector.

35. Dr Phillip Lee (Tory)

Has worked as a freelance or Medical Solutions Ltd, which provided medical cover for events.

36. Oliver Letwin – former shadow chancellor (Tory)

Was a non-executive director of N.M. Rothschild Corporate Finance Ltd, which invests heavily in healthcare.

37. Peter Lilley (Tory)

Non-Executive director of management software firm Idox plc, which provides services to the NHS Health Libraries Group and NHS Education for Scotland.

38. Tim Loughton  (Tory)

Received £350 for training sessions with Cumberlege Connections, a political networking firm that works “extensively” with the pharmaceutical industry.

39. Mary Macleod  (Tory)

Was a senior executive at Andersen Consulting/Accenture, which has profited from big PFI deals.

40. Francis Maude – Cabinet Office Secretary (Tory)

Was a director of PR firm Huntsworth plc, which was part of lobbying group Healthcare Communications Association.

41. Maria Miller – former Culture Secretary  (Tory)

Former director of Grey’s Advertising Ltd, an advertising and brand company which worked extensively with clients in the healthcare sector.

42. Andrew Mitchell – former International Development Secretary  (Tory)

Was a strategy adviser to global management firm Accenture, which has worked extensively with private healthcare companies and the NHS.

43. Penny Mordaunt – Communities Minister  (Tory)

Worked for lobbying firm Hanover, where she had a range of healthcare clients.

44. Brooks Newmark – former Charities Minister (Tory)

Partner in the Allele Fund, which invests in healthcare startups.

45. Jesse Norman (Tory)

Received £5,000 from asset manager Crispin Odey, a major investor in Circle.

46. Stephen O’Brien (Tory)

Received payments totalling £40,000 from Julian Schild, whose family made £184million in 2006 by selling hospital bed-makers Huntleigh Technology.

47. George Osborne – Chancellor (Tory)

Received donation through Conservative Campaign Headquarters from Julian Schild – see above.

48. Priti Patel – Treasury Minister (Tory)

Worked for lobbying firm Weber Shandwick, which does PR for big healthcare and pharmaceutical firms.

49. John Redwood – former Cabinet Minister  (Tory)

Advised the private equity company which runs Pharmacy2u, the UK’s largest dedicated internet and mail order pharmacy.

50. Jacob Rees-Mogg  (Tory)

Partner of Somerset Capital Management LLP, which has healthcare investor Redwood Emerging Markets Dividend Income Fund as a client.

51. Sir Malcolm Rifkind – former Foreign Secretary (Tory)

Chairman of advisory board at L.E.K. Consulting LLP, which helps private healthcare firms identify “new business development” and “opportunities with the Government”.

52. Amber Rudd – Energy Minister (Tory)

Received £3,000 from hedge fund baron Andrew Law, a major investor in healthcare firms.

53. David Ruffley  (Tory)

Received £10,000 in donations from Caroline Nash, wife of former Care UK chairman John Nash.

54. Mark Simmonds – former Foreign Minister (Tory)

Was paid £50,000 a year as a “strategic adviser” to Circle Health.

55. Chris Skidmore (Tory)

Received £3,500 for speeches to STAC Consultancy, which specialises in the launch of pharmaceutical products.

56. Julian Smith  (Tory)

Received a £2,500 donation from Principle Healthcare Ltd in September 2014.

57. Nicholas Soames (Tory)

Received £2,000 from asset manager Crispin Odey, a major investor in Circle.

58. John Stanley (Tory)

Consultant on financial services to FIL Investment Management Ltd, which invests in healthcare.

59. Andrew Tyrie – select committee chairman (Tory)

Attended the Ryder Cup as Secretary of the Parliamentary Golf Society, with travel and accommodation paid for by U.S. healthcare services company Humana Europe.

60. Robin Walker  (Tory)

His office received a £2,000 donation from Redwood Care Homes, which owns multiple care homes.

61. David Willetts – former Universities Minister (Tory)

Has shares in Sensortec, a company that owns Vantix which was working on a contract for a new product to detect MRSI.

62. Rob Wilson (Tory)

Had registered shares in Vital Imaging, a private screening company.

63. Tim Yeo (Tory)

Also attended the 2008 Ryder Cup, courtesy of Humana Europe.

64. Nadhim Zahawi (Tory)

Non-executive director of recruitment company SThree, which specialises in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology sector.

65. Menzies Campbell – former leader (Liberal Democrat)

Non-executive director of Scottish American Investment Company plc, which took over one of the care homes when Southern Cross collapsed.

66. Vince Cable – Business Secretary (Liberal Democrat)

Received a donation of £2,000 from Chartwell Care Services, which is 100% owned by Chartwell Health & Care PLC. It also owns Chartwell Private Hospitals plc, which provide day case surgery to NHS patients.

67. Nick Clegg – Deputy Prime Minister  (Liberal Democrat)

Received a donation to his constituency office for £5,000 from Alpha Medical Consultancy.

68. Simon Hughes – Justice Minister (Liberal Democrat)

Received £60,000 donation to his constituency party from the founder of Alpha Hospitals, a private hospital firm.

69. Stephen Lloyd  (Liberal Democrat)

MP for Eastbourne. Received £544.92 aggregated over time for office equipment from Platon Medical Ltd – who provides Ear, Nose and throat devices.

70. Robert Smith (Liberal Democrat)

Has shares in pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline.

71. Jo Swinson – Business Minister (Liberal Democrat)

Received a donation of £2,000 September 2013 from private optician firm, Peter Ivins Eye Care.

Dodgy MPs taking part in votes which they have a financial interest in can be reported to the Parliamentary Standards Commissioner, Kathryn Hudson – email: hudsonk@parliament.uk

Key responsibilities:

* Overseeing the maintenance and monitoring the operation of the Register of Members’ Financial Interests
* Providing advice on a confidential basis to individual Members and to the Select Committee on Standards about the interpretation of the Code of Conduct and Guide to the Rules relating to the Conduct of Members
* Monitoring the operation of the Code of Conduct and Guide to the Rules and, where appropriate, proposing possible modifications of it to the Committee on Standards
* Preparing guidance and providing training for Members on matters of conduct, propriety and ethics
* Receiving and investigating complaints about Members who are allegedly in breach of the Code of Conduct and Guide to the Rules, and reporting her findings to the Committee on Standards
* The Commissioner also presents an annual report to the House of Commons on the work of her office

List of MPs taken from this source:
http://voxpoliticalonline.com/2014/11/18/named-and-shamed-the-government-mps-profiting-from-nhs-sell-off/

FoI attempts Tory cover up & fails

FoI attempts Tory cover-up and fails dismally

FoI attempts Tory cover-up and fails dismally

The FoI team appear to have purposely covered up information relating to Tory responses to the UN who’re conducting their first ever inquiry against the Tory Government in the UK for abuse of disabled people.

On August 20th 2014 FoI requests were sent to The Prime Minister’s Office and The Cabinet Office asking for recorded information ‘containing any formal or informal Government correspondence or statements made in response to finding out about this investigation’.

Both responses stated no information was held.  However a third request was made on that same day to the DWP asking for the same information, but the response was extraordinary.  Not only did the information supplied not relate to the question being asked, but the information which was messy and inaccurate.  

The response stated the United Nations Inquiry was confidential – which is only half true.  It is confidential but only until the outcome as the United Nations state themselves here.  But in no place did the FoI request ask for that information.

Furthermore since the request was entered, Tory MP Michael Ellis said: “This politically motivated loony left decision brings the UN organisation into disrepute.  At a time when there are grave international crises around the world and when in dozens of countries around the world there are no benefits available, this absurd decision is made to attack our country which rightly does more than almost any other to protect the rights of disadvantaged people from all walks of life.”

Then a spokesperson for the Department for Work and Pensions said: “This Government is committed to supporting disabled people and we continue to spend around £50bn a year on disabled people and their services.”

Sources here and here

The creator of the request has now followed procedure and entered an internal review to sort out the messy response.  They have made it clear that if the information isn’t provided they will take it up with the Information Commissioners Office.

The United Nations has opened two Inquiries against the Tories but this one is far more serious.  In order to be a part of the UN the UK signed various treaties.  The areas being called into question are as follows:

  • The right to independent living (UNCRPD Article 19)
  • The right to work (ICESCR Article 6 and UNCRPD Article 27)
  • The right to fair and just conditions of employment (ICESCR Article 7 and UNCRPD Article 27)
  • The right to social security (ICESCR Article 9)
  • The right to social protection (UNCRPD Article 28)
  • The right to an adequate standard of living (ICESCR Article 11 and UNCRPD Article 28)

The right to independent living

“There is prima facie evidence that [the local housing allowance and the size criteria in social housing] are retrogressive, threatening disabled people’s occupation of accessible and affordable housing to enable them to live independently, exercising their right to choose where they live on an equal basis with others.”

“…. when evaluating the Government’s final decision to proceed with the closure of the [Independent Living Fund]… any change in support that threatens fund users’ enjoyment of the right to independent living would constitute impermissible retrogression in relation to UNCRPD Article 19.”

“Given the critical role of social care services in facilitating independent living, we recommend that the Government ensures sufficient investment is directed towards ensuring that disabled people receive the support they need to exercise their right to independent living.”

“Despite the complexity and limitations of cumulative impact assessments, the evidence does appear to show that the JCHR’s concerns about the cumulative impact of a number of reforms and policy changes on independent living have been realised. If disabled people are hit by two, three, four or even more separate changes to benefits, social care and other services, they lose much of the support they need to live independently in the community in terms of UNCRPD Article 19.”

“…. the importance of fulfilling disabled people’s right to independent living is such that serious consideration should be given to incorporating UNCRPD Article 19 (and related international human rights protections) into UK domestic law. This could be done so as to provide an overarching statutory duty on all areas of Government to take account of the need to respect, protect and fulfil disabled people’s right to independent living, and a duty to avoid retrogression, in all relevant policymaking.”

The rights to work, to social security and to an adequate standard of living

“… there continue to be significant barriers to disabled people’s access to the labour market, compromising their enjoyment of the right to work and the right to fair and just conditions of employment.”

“The key concern in relation to employment and support allowance, and the operation of the work capability assessment, is that the structure of the benefit and the frequency of inaccurate assessments leaves many people with long term health conditions in a no-man’s land – neither eligible for out of work benefits nor able to undertake paid work. This failure to provide income replacement benefits to disabled people and people with long term health conditions when they are unable to work constitutes a failure to respect, protect and fulfil disabled people’s right to social security … and, for many disabled people, their right to an adequate standard of living….”

“[Disabled people] are disproportionately affected by the reduced availability of advice services, which has an impact on their enjoyment of their… right to social security and, for many, an adequate standard of living.”

“There are a number of factors that increase the risk of disabled people becoming destitute, which reflect a failure to comply with the minimum core obligations under ICESCR and UNCRPD and to guarantee their rights to social security, social protection and an adequate standard of living…. appropriate recommendations include refocusing the ethos and performance management of DWP and JobCentre Plus so that their primary responsibility is to ensure claimants are able to support themselves and their families – by being supported to enjoy their rights to work, to social security and to an adequate standard of living…”

Significant evidence has already been gathered.  

We provide it here in Easy read format,  Summary Report and the full report.

Evidence – Just Fair. Online Survey of Disabled People and allies. Excel Version.

Evidence – Just Fair. Online survey of disabled people and their allies. Part 1 (DOCX)

Evidence – Just Fair. Online survey of disabled people and their allies. Part 2. (DOCX)

Evidence – Just Fair. Emailed case-studies from disabled people and their allies. (DOCX)

So given all that evidence (and more still being collected), Tory MP Michael Ellis claiming it’s all ‘politically motivated’ we question his integrity. We certainly don’t believe he’s read the above evidence.

Why Government doesn’t want to give up fossil fuel

The Fossil Fuel Web Of Power

The Fossil Fuel Web Of Power http://postimg.org/image/sdsps2rkp/full/

The links between government, fossil fuels and the financial sector

The links between government, fossil fuels and the financial sector

Philip Hammond

Philip Hammond – financial interests in fossil fuel

https://www.gov.uk/government/people/philip-hammond

Mark Lancaster

Mark Lancaster – financial interests in fossil fuel

https://www.gov.uk/government/people/mark-lancaster

Hugh Robertson

Hugh Robertson – financial interests in fossil fuel

https://www.gov.uk/government/people/hugh-robertson

Lord Green of Hurstpierpoint

Lord Green of Hurstpierpoint – financial interests in fossil fuel

https://www.gov.uk/government/people/lord-green-of-hurstpierpoint

Michael Fallon

Michael Fallon – financial interests in fossil fuels

https://www.gov.uk/government/people/michael-fallon

Nick Hurd

Nick Hurd – financial interests in fossil fuels

https://www.gov.uk/government/people/nick-hurd

William Hague

William Hague – financial interests in fossil fuels

https://www.gov.uk/government/people/william-hague

Lavid Laws - financial interests in fossil fuels

Lavid Laws – financial interests in fossil fuels

https://www.gov.uk/government/people/david-laws

Mark Hoban - financial interests in fossil fuels

Mark Hoban – financial interests in fossil fuels

https://www.gov.uk/government/people/mark-hoban

Gregory Barker - financial interests in fossil fuels

Gregory Barker – financial interests in fossil fuels

https://www.gov.uk/government/people/gregory-barker

Elizabeth Truss - financial interests in fossil fuels

Elizabeth Truss – financial interests in fossil fuels

https://www.gov.uk/government/people/elizabeth-truss

John Nash - financial interests in fossil fuels

John Nash – financial interests in fossil fuels

https://www.gov.uk/government/people/john-nash

Sajid Javid - financial interests in fossil fuels

Sajid Javid – financial interests in fossil fuels

https://www.gov.uk/government/people/sajid-javid

Philip Dunne - financial interests in fossil fuels

Philip Dunne – financial interests in fossil fuels

https://www.gov.uk/government/people/philip-dunne

George Gideon Osborne - financial interests in fossil fuels

George Gideon Osborne – financial interests in fossil fuels

https://www.gov.uk/government/people/george-osborne

Maria Miller - financial interests in fossil fuels

Maria Miller – financial interests in fossil fuels aka the factory killer

https://www.gov.uk/government/people/maria-miller

Nick Clegg - financial interests in fossil fuels

Nick Clegg – financial interests in fossil fuels

https://www.gov.uk/government/people/nick-clegg

Stephen Hammond - financial interests in fossil fuels

Stephen Hammond – financial interests in fossil fuels

https://www.gov.uk/government/people/stephen-hammond

Robert Goodwill - financial interests in fossil fuels

Robert Goodwill – financial interests in fossil fuels

https://www.gov.uk/government/people/robert-goodwill

Theresa May - financial interests in fossil fuels

Theresa May – financial interests in fossil fuels

https://www.gov.uk/government/people/theresa-may

Andrew Robathan - financial interests in fossil fuels

Andrew Robathan – financial interests in fossil fuels

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon - financial interests in fossil fuels

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon – financial interests in fossil fuels

David Lidington - financial interests in fossil fuels

David Lidington – financial interests in fossil fuels

David Mundell - financial interests in fossil fuels

David Mundell – financial interests in fossil fuels

Matthew Hancock - financial interests in fossil fuels

Matthew Hancock – financial interests in fossil fuels

https://www.gov.uk/government/people/matthew-hancock

Michael Gove - financial interests in fossil fuels

Michael Gove – financial interests in fossil fuels

https://www.gov.uk/government/people/michael-gove

Kenneth Clarke - financial interests in fossil fuels

Kenneth Clarke – financial interests in fossil fuels

https://www.gov.uk/government/people/kenneth-clarke

Desmond Swayne - financial interests in fossil fuels

Desmond Swayne – financial interests in fossil fuels

https://www.gov.uk/government/people/desmond-swayne

David Willets - financial interests in fossil fuels

David Willets – financial interests in fossil fuels

https://www.gov.uk/government/people/david-willets

Earl Howe - financial interests in fossil fuels

Earl Howe – financial interests in fossil fuels

https://www.gov.uk/government/people/earl-howe

Lord Deighton - financial interests in fossil fuels

Lord Deighton – financial interests in fossil fuels

https://www.gov.uk/government/people/lord-deighton

Greg Hands - financial interests in fossil fuels

Greg Hands – financial interests in fossil fuels

https://www.gov.uk/government/people/greg-hands

Francis Maude - financial interests in fossil fuels

Francis Maude – financial interests in fossil fuels

https://www.gov.uk/government/people/francis-maude

Vincent Cable - financial interests in fossil fuels

Vincent Cable – financial interests in fossil fuels

https://www.gov.uk/government/people/vince-cable

Alan Duncan - financial interests in fossil fuels

Alan Duncan – financial interests in fossil fuels

https://www.gov.uk/government/people/alan-duncan

Lord Freud - financial interests in fossil fuels

Lord Freud – financial interests in fossil fuels

https://www.gov.uk/government/people/lord-freud

David Cameron - financial interests in fossil fuels

David Cameron – financial interests in fossil fuels Accepted £10,000 from Jonathan Green of hedge fund GLG Partners Accepted £10,000 from Mark Foster Brown of hedge fund Altima Partners (2005)

https://www.gov.uk/government/people/david-cameron

Jo Johnson - financial interests in fossil fuels

Jo Johnson – financial interests in fossil fuels

https://www.gov.uk/government/people/jo-johnson

Dominic Grieve - financial interests in fossil fuels

Dominic Grieve – financial interests in fossil fuels

https://www.gov.uk/government/people/dominic-grieve

Oliver Letwin - financial interests in fossil fuels

Oliver Letwin – financial interests in fossil fuels Directorships and other senior positions at investment bank NM Rothschild (1986-2009)

https://www.gov.uk/government/people/oliver-letwin

Be a Cabinet Minister – No experience or qualifications required (except for Lord Chancellor role)

Be a Cabinet Minister - No experience or qualifications required

Be a Cabinet Minister – No experience or qualifications required

Cabinet Ministers come and go over the years but if you notice one or two who seem out of their depth you’re not alone. So how did they get the job? Well it’s up to the Prime Minister to form his or her Cabinet from the collection of MPs (or indeed Lords) of his/her political party.

No qualifications or experience needed to be a cabinet minister! – see for yourself in the ICO response

Let’s put names to the numbers (and faces) above:

1. Chief Whip

Patrick McLoughlin  (2010-12); Andrew Mitchell (Sept-Oct 2012);  Sir George Young (2012-14);  Michael Gove (2014-)
The job usually involves imposing disciple, but Gove’s job will include selling the Tories to the voters.

2. Home Secretary

Theresa May (2010-)
Tough, having survived an open feud with Gove. Still a contender for the leadership.

3. Universities and Science Minister

David Willetts (2010-14);  Greg Clark (2014-)
Academics liked Willetts though the reforms he oversaw were unpopular. A hard act to follow.

4. Cabinet Office Minister, for Policy

Oliver Letwin (2010-)
A job created for the  cerebral Mr Letwin.

5. Business Secretary

Vince Cable (2010-)
Much criticised over the cut-price sale of Royal Mail – but it is for Nick Clegg to decide whether to sack him.

6. Paymaster General

Francis Maude (2010-)
Maude’s main task has been civil service reform. Many civil servants would like to see the back of him, but he is still there.

7. Secretary of State, Communities and Local Government

Eric Pickles (2010-)
Pickles has upset a lot of councillors and it  was thought he might be sacked, but he remains.

8. Leader of the Lords 

Lord Strathclyde (2010-13); Lord Hill (2013-14); Baroness Stowell (2014-)
Baroness Stowell is not a full member of Cabinet, unlike her predecessors.

9. Health Secretary

Andrew Lansley (2010-12); Jeremy Hunt (2012-)
After Lansley’s frenetic and ill-judged NHS reforms, Hunt’s job is to keep the  NHS out of the news.

10. Leader of the Commons

Sir George Young (2010-12); Andrew Lansley (2012-14); William Hague (2014-)
Organising Commons business will not take much time – Hague’s real job will be promoting the Tories.

11. Education Secretary

Michael Gove (2010-14); Nicky Morgan (2014-)
Morgan’s task will be to keep education out of the news in order not to put teachers off voting Conservative.

12. International Development Secretary

Andrew Mitchell (2010-2012); Justine Greening (2012-)
Cameron would not like you to think the Conservatives do not care about the Third World, so Greening is left  to dispense a big budget.

13. Transport Secretary

Philip Hammond (2010-12); Patrick McLoughlin (2012-)
HS2 was sorted before McLoughlin arrived, and Heathrow expansion is being left until after the election.

14. Energy Secretary

Chris Huhne (2010-12); Ed Davey (2012-)
A good job for a Liberal Democrat with an ambition to replace Nick Clegg –  provided he drives with care.

15. Culture Secretary

Jeremy Hunt (2010-12); Maria Miller (2012-14); Sajid Javid  (2014-)
A small department but with hugely sensitive issues like press regulation. Javid has so far avoided controversy

16. Northern Ireland Secretary

Owen Paterson (2010-12); Theresa Villiers (2012-)
Northern Ireland’s home-grown politicians decide how difficult this job is – for now it is relatively problem free.

17. Scottish Secretary

Danny Alexander (2010); Michael Moore (2010-13); Alistair Carmichael (2013-)
His main – and only –task is to keep Scotland in the UK.

18. Attorney General

Dominic Grieve (2010-14); Jeremy Wright (2014-)
If the intention is to renounce European Human Rights legislation, sacking Grieve was a necessary first step.

19. Cabinet Secretary

Sir Gus O’Donnell (2005-11) Sir Jeremy Haywood (2012-)
The Cabinet Secretary makes sure the Whitehall machine carries on as normal.

20. Work and Pensions Secretary 

Iain Duncan Smith (2010-)
Still there so he can clear up his own mess.

21. Defence Secretary 

Liam Fox (2010-11); Philip Hammond (2011-14); Michael Fallon (2014-)
A well-timed announcement of extra money for defence should make Fallon’s job easy.

22. Chancellor of the Exchequer 

George Osborne  (2010-)
With the economy beginning to improve, Osborne still has his eyes on being the next Conservative Prime Minister

23. Foreign Secretary

William Hague (2010-14); Philip Hammond (2014-)
Hague’s successor will have to knuckle down to sorting relations with Europe.

24. Prime Minister

David Cameron

25. Deputy Prime Minister

Nick Clegg

26. Conservative Chairman

Baroness Warsi (2010-12); Grant Shapps (2012-)
Shapps has belied predictions that he would be sacked, but with Hague and Gove now available, he will not be in sole charge of the campaign.

27. Welsh Secretary 

Cheryl Gillan (2010-12); David Jones (2012-14); Stephen Crabbe (2014-)
A non-job since devolution.

28. Environment Secretary 

Caroline Spelman (2010-12); Owen Paterson (2011-14); Liz Truss (2014-)
Both predecessors were sacked. She must get flood defences in place and think twice about the badger cull.

29. Justice Secretary

Kenneth Clarke (2010- 12); Chris Grayling (2012-)
Grayling is in conflict with judges over legal aid and with Europe over human rights law, which pleases the right.  Of course it would save the taxpayer money if Grayling was actually a qualified lawyer (but he isn’t so it doesn’t).

30. Chief Secretary to  the Treasury

David Laws (May 2010); Danny Alexander (2010-)
Until recently, Alexander’s main task was smoothing over relations between  Coalition partners.

So what was the giveaway to us that they weren’t qualified?

Originally let’s just say “the clues were there” with news stories from 2010 onwards questioning the competence of “the quiet man” Iain Duncan Smith.  Who could forget his “I’m turning up the volume” speech back when he was Tory leader.  But in his role of DWP Minister his (cough) ‘talents’ are there for us all to see.

The next big clue was Helen Grant when she was Minister of Sport.  She was given a little sports quiz with some questions which anyone connected with sport should have been able to answer – but not Ms Grant.  In fact she failed to correctly answer any of the sports questions put to her.  So when that happened, one of our friends put in a Freedom of Information request to find out what qualifications and experience Cabinet Ministers needed.  Guess what?  They had nothing on file!  So the request went to the very helpful Information Commissioner’s Office who provided this statement on the subject:

Cabinet Minister Qualifications & Experience –  ICO Response

Traditionally, the Prime Minister chooses Ministers from elected Members of the House of Commons (MPs). However, they may also choose Members from the House of Lords. Ministers are chosen from individuals who are members of the party of government (or, in the current case, the parties of government).

The Prime Minister may well choose someone who has no direct experience of the work covered by the department, for example, the minister for health is rarely a health professional. However, it is for the Prime Minister to determine what other qualities that person has to fulfil the role. It is also for the Prime Minister to determine whether that person continues to be suitable for the role. The minister themselves may offer their resignation if, for whatever reason, they do not feel able to continue in the ministerial role.

Ministers are regularly challenged in and out of Parliament (for example, in the media) to explain their actions but it remains the Prime Minister’s decision as to whether they are suitable for the
job.

For your general information, here is a link to the UK Parliament website which might be helpful on this general topic:

http://www.parliament.uk/about/how/role/parliament-government/

Here also, for your general information, is a link showing ministers in the current Cabinet. The link provides biographical information but you may, of course, also wish to conduct your own online searches using their names to find biographical information from other independent online sources.

https://www.gov.uk/government/ministers/

You may well question whether a particular minister is qualified for their ministerial role and you may make an assessment about the party of government and about the Prime Minister based on how well, in your view, their ministers perform. That is a matter for you (and for all of us as the UK electorate).

ICO

23 April 2014
Case Reference Number FS50535109

So there you have it – if you’re an elected MP or a Lord (not elected) and you fancy being a cabinet member, have a word with the Prime Minister – no experience or qualifications needed.  Who knows – you may be the next Iain Duncan Smith or Helen Grant.

Additional information sourced from:

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/movers-and-shakers-what-happened-to-camerons-2010-cabinet-9608320.html